Giving patients a HED-SMART head start

May 27, 2013

A paper co-authored by academics from City's School of Health Sciences was named among the top 10 best abstracts submitted to the prestigious European Renal Association and European Dialysis and Transplant Association's (ERA-EDTA) annual congress. The paper was one of more than 2,400 abstracts submitted for consideration by the expert international panel.

Dr Konstantina Griva, an Honorary Senior Visiting Research Fellow at City, was lead investigator on the paper entitled 'Short and long-term outcomes of the hemodialysis intervention randomised trial (HED-SMART) - a practical low intensity intervention to improve adherence and ' Hayley McBain, a Research Fellow at City also contributed.

For receiving hemodialysis it is vital that diet, fluid and medication recommendations are closely adhered to. However, the success of self management is often patchy and the importance of following the advice is not well understood.

The researchers examined the use of a HED-SMART intervention, a four session, group based, self management intervention on treatment adherence for patients on hemodialysis. They found the HED-SMART program had significant post-intervention improvements in both clinical markers and self-report adherence.

The ERA-EDTA is one of the fastest growing Medical Association whose purpose is to encourage and to report advances in the field of clinical nephrology, dialysis, renal transplantation and related subjects. Their annual conference is the world leading event for practitioners and researchers in the fields of clinical nephrology, hypertension, dialysis and .

Professor Stanton Newman, Dean of the School of Health Sciences and a co-author on the paper, said: "We are delighted that the we designed, based on our previous work, has proved successful for this patient group. Not only did it improve adherence to the complex regimen these patients have to follow but it also improved markers of the patients clinical status."

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