Improving systematic reviews of animal studies will help translational medicine

Many new developments and initiatives have been introduced to improve the quality and translational value of animal research, and must continue with support from the wider scientific community. These are the conclusions of a new article in PLOS Medicine this week by Carlijn Hooijmans and colleagues from the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Netherlands, who summarize these new developments.

Focusing on the quality of study conduct, reporting, and replication; systematic reviews and meta-analyses; and study registration, , and data sharing, the authors argue that systematic reviews of animal studies should be conducted routinely. Funding agencies should subsidize systematic reviews, not simply for transparency, but also to avoid waste of financial resources and unnecessary duplication of animal studies, they say, and an international register for animal studies should be established and funded.

"Improving the quality and translation of requires co-operation from the wider scientific community, journals, researchers, regulators, funding bodies, peer reviewers and patients," conclude the authors.

More information: Hooijmans CR, Ritskes-Hoitinga M (2013) Progress in Using Systematic Reviews of Animal Studies to Improve Translational Research. PLoS Med 10(7): e1001482. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001482

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

How should systematic reviews consider evidence on harms?

May 03, 2011

Systematic reviews that attempt to assess the risk of harms (adverse effects) associated with specific therapies should consider a broad range of study designs, including both systematic reviews and observational studies. ...

Recommended for you

Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies

11 hours ago

Dr. Denham Harman, a renowned scientist who developed the most widely accepted theory on aging that's now used to study cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other illnesses, has died in Nebraska at age 98.

Mexican boy who had massive tumor recovering

21 hours ago

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had pieces of a massive tumor removed and who drew international attention after U.S. officials helped him get treatment in the southwestern U.S. state of New Mexico is still recovering after ...

New medical device to make the mines safer

Nov 21, 2014

Dehydration can be a serious health issue for Australia's mining industry, but a new product to be developed with input from Flinders University's Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) is set to more effectively ...

US family gets $6.75 million in Botox case

Nov 20, 2014

A New York couple who said Botox treatment of their son's cerebral palsy left him with life-threatening complications and sued its manufacturer won a $6.75 million verdict from a federal jury on Thursday.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.