UAE identifies 4 new cases of SARS-like virus

July 19, 2013

(AP)—Health authorities in the United Arab Emirates have identified four new cases of a respiratory virus related to SARS whose main concentration has been in neighboring Saudi Arabia.

The new cases also could offer investigators fresh leads on the transmission of the virus, which has claimed more than 40 lives since September. Most of the deaths have been in Saudi Arabia.

The official news agency WAM quotes as saying a previously identified patient with the virus apparently passed it to at least four others. Friday's statement added there were no plans to restrict travel or increase screenings.

The virus is related to SARS, which killed some 800 people in a global outbreak in 2003. It belongs to a family of viruses that most often cause the common cold.

Explore further: Saudi Arabia reports three cases of SARS-like virus

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