New initiative announced for patient-doc collaboration

New initiative announced for patient-doc collaboration
A new Center for Patient Partnership in Healthcare has been launched to advance physician-patient collaboration, according to a report published by the American College of Physicians.

(HealthDay)—A new Center for Patient Partnership in Healthcare (CPPH) has been launched to advance physician-patient collaboration, according to a report published by the American College of Physicians (ACP).

The CPPH will be guided by an Advisory Board for Patient Partnership in Healthcare, chaired by the immediate past chair of ACP's Board of Regents, Phyllis Guze, M.D., M.P.H. The Board will include two representatives from patient organizations, several physicians, a nurse, and a physician assistant.

The CPPH will engage patients, families, and patient organizations as partners with the ACP to advance collaboration between physicians and patients. The CPPH will join the ACP to design patient-centered care delivery and develop for patients.

"To promote and practice truly patient-centered care, we as a physician organization have to work closely with patient partners, hearing their voice and assuring that care is focused on patients' needs and preferences," Steven Weinberger, M.D., ACP's executive vice president and , said in a statement. "We envision the CPPH as the vehicle to move in that direction."

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