Stomach bug triggers mass vomiting on Qantas flight

Dozens of people were rushed off a Qantas flight for medical treatment in Sydney on Thursday after a stomach bug struck mid-journey, triggering a mass vomiting episode.

Qantas said a "number of passengers travelling in the same group on QF28 (between) Santiago and Sydney became unwell with a gastro intestinal illness" on the 14-hour journey to Australia.

Media reports said between 20 and 30 passengers were vomiting as they disembarked in Sydney and were met by a fleet of .

"It is believed the illness was contracted before boarding the aircraft and symptoms became evident during the flight," Qantas said in a statement.

"The aircraft has been met by medical staff to look after the unwell passengers."

As a precaution, Qantas said all other passengers on the flight were advised to monitor their health closely over the next 24-48 hours.

Health authorities said they had been advised that "26 passengers returning on a Qantas flight from Santiago, Chile, developed vomiting and diarrhoea on the plane, consistent with norovirus infection, a common cause of outbreaks of in Australia and elsewhere".

"New South Wales Health has provided Qantas with a letter and factsheet about viral gastro to distribute to all departing passengers, as well as advice for cleaning and cabin staff," the state's health office said in a statement.

It said the sick group was assessed by paramedics and escorted out of the airport "with minimal exposure to other passengers" after they were cleared to go home.

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and7barton
not rated yet Aug 01, 2013
I corrected a small mistake for you - "South Wales Health has provided Qantas with a letter and factsheet about viral gastro to distribute to all departing passengers, as well as advice for cleaning THE cabin staff," the state's health office said in a statement.
DarkHorse66
4.5 / 5 (2) Aug 02, 2013
Um, shouldn't that be "TO THE cabin staff"? Grammatically, you are making it sound as though the cabin staff need to be cleaned themselves, rather than the aeroplane. Either that or the original sentence: ""New South Wales Health has provided Qantas with a letter and factsheet about viral gastro to distribute to all departing passengers, as well as advice for cleaning and cabin staff," the state's health office said in a statement." was actually correct (the more likely scenario) and the author was avoiding a doubling up of the word 'staff' in the one sentence. Perhaps this technique can cause confusion at times, but grammatically quite permissible and even encouraged. Then there is the issue that cleaning staff and cabin staff are two separate and distinct jobs, despite the fact that the cabin staff would have had to do some inflight cleaning up of ejecta and thus been directly exposed too.
Best Regards, DH66
gwrede
1 / 5 (1) Aug 04, 2013
If airlines understood how much this impacts their image, they'd really try to save on other things.

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