Honduras confirms 27 deaths from dengue fever

October 24, 2013

A Honduran dengue fever epidemic has killed 27 people so far this year and infected some 31,960 individuals, health officials said Wednesday.

A total of 18 men and nine women have died in one of the country's worst bout of the disease in terms of fatalities, according to Bredy Lara, director of surveillance for the health ministry.

Dengue, transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, occurs in Central America mostly during its rainy season from May to November.

The disease causes fever, muscle and joint ache as well as potentially fatal and dengue shock syndrome.

President Porfirio Lobo's government declared a nationwide emergency in July, when 16 people had died and more than 12,000 cases had been reported.

He also launched a campaign to control mosquito reproduction sites.

Last year, Honduras reported some 8,000 cases of dengue and two deaths, compared with no deaths in 2011.

The worst recent year for in Honduras was 2010, when 83 people died among some 66,000 reported cases and 3,000 instances of , according to officials.

Explore further: Honduras declares emergency after dengue kills 16

Related Stories

Dengue raises alarm in Central America

July 3, 2013

Authorities have issued dengue alerts in four nations across Central America, where alarm is rising as the mosquito-borne disease has infected 30,000 people and killed 17 this year alone.

Dengue epidemic looms for Central American region

August 9, 2013

Central America is on track to have one of its worst years ever for the painful, sometimes fatal disease of dengue, prompting governments across the region to mobilize against the mosquito-borne virus.

Dengue fever outbreak hits Costa Rica

April 10, 2013

Health officials in Costa Rica said an outbreak of dengue fever has sickened 7,000 people, with many cases occurring in some of this Central American country's most popular tourist areas.

Recommended for you

Acne sufferers' cells may be protected against aging

September 28, 2016

Scientists at King's College London have found that people who have previously suffered from acne are likely to have longer telomeres (the protective repeated nucleotides found at the end of chromosomes) in their white blood ...

Antibiotics developed in 1960s show promise for TB therapy

September 28, 2016

First generation cephalosporins—antibiotics introduced as a treatment against bacterial infections in 1963—now show promise for tuberculosis (TB) therapy, according to new research published in Scientific Reports.

Kidney stone? Try a roller coaster ride

September 27, 2016

(HealthDay)—Anyone who's suffered a kidney stone just wants the urinary obstruction gone. Now, preliminary research suggests relief might even be fun: a roller coaster ride.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.