Nestle to speed up salt reductions in food brands

The world's biggest food and drink company is pledging to speed up making hundreds of products with less salt to honor new U.N. dietary guidelines.

Swiss-based Nestle says further cuts in salt would be made in all its food brands worldwide in keeping with the World Health Organization's new guideline earlier this year that adults should limit salt intake to no more than five grams per day.

The company's statement Monday said hundreds of would be affected, including soups, noodles, recipe mixes, frozen and chilled meals and pizzas in popular brands such as Maggi, Stouffer's and DiGiorno.

Nestle says it previous efforts "to progressively and continuously reduce the salt in its foods" have already reduced the amount of used in its recipes by 14,043 tons compared to 2005.

Related Stories

Fewer people adding salt at the table

date Jan 28, 2013

The number of people in England adding salt to food at the table fell by more than a quarter in the five years following a national campaign, according to research published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Less salt in our food

date Jun 03, 2013

It is entirely possible to reduce the salt content in a range of foods by up to 30% without reducing the taste.

Recommended for you

Footpaths and parks support active school commute

date 3 hours ago

While it probably won't make the idea of attending school more appealing social scientists say different infrastructure and behaviour change programs are key to encouraging young people to take a more active ...

Food barometer measures a population’'s eating habits

date 4 hours ago

A survey by Taylor's-Toulouse University Centre (TTUC) is collecting data on the food habits of individuals and how their choices are related to modernisation and other social factors. Results show that almost ...

Who you gonna call? Beijing smokebusters to go on patrol

date 8 hours ago

China's capital seeks to snuff out smoking in indoor public places on Monday with a new ban, unprecedented fines and a hotline to report offenders, but enforcement is doubtful in one of the world's most tobacco-addicted countries.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.