Texting heart medication reminders improved patient adherence

November 18, 2013

Getting reminder texts helped patients take their heart medicines (anti-platelet and cholesterol-lowering drugs) more regularly, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013.

In a 30-day, randomized controlled trial of 90 patients, one group received customized text education messages and medication reminders; a second group got education messages only; and a third received no texts.

The text messaging groups had a 16 percent to 17 percent higher rate of taking correct doses and a higher rate of taking doses on schedule compared to the group who didn't receive text messaging.

"There is now a major initiative to apply more innovative technologies such as mHealth, eHealth, and telehealth to effectively intervene to promote ," said Linda Park, Ph.D., study lead author and post-doctoral fellow at San Francisco VA Medical Center in California.

Explore further: Can text messaging improve medication adherence?

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