Central adiposity may blunt metabolism, worsen weight gain

December 3, 2013
Central adiposity may blunt metabolism, worsen weight gain

(HealthDay)—In those with body mass index (BMI) greater than 29 kg/m2, awake and fed thermogenesis is reduced, and this change in energy balance predicts future weight gain, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

Paolo Piaggi, M.D., of the National Institutes of Health in Phoenix, and colleagues measured whole-room 24-hour energy expenditure (EE) in 509 healthy subjects (368 Native Americans and 141 whites) who consumed a eucaloric diet, calculated awake and fed thermogenesis (AFT), then used follow-up data for 290 Native Americans to assess the association between AFT and weight change.

The researchers found that AFT accounted for approximately 10 percent of 24-hour EE and was inversely related to age and fasting glucose concentration. Energy intake was the main factor that determined AFT. For individuals with BMI greater than 29 kg/m², AFT was inversely related to BMI. After accounting for covariates, the residual variance of AFT predicted future weight change, but only in those with BMI greater than 29 kg/m².

"AFT may influence daily , is reduced in obese individuals, and predicts future weight gain in these subjects," the authors write. "Once central adiposity develops, a blunting of AFT may occur that then contributes to further weight gain."

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