Tips for safe winter workouts

Tips for safe winter workouts
Avoiding hypothermia is crucial, expert says.

(HealthDay)—If you exercise outdoors during the winter, be sure to do so safely, an expert says.

The major concern for people who exercise in the cold is hypothermia, or too much , according to Dr. Cedric Bryant, chief science officer at the American Council on Exercise.

He offered the following tips:

  • Dress in layers. This will give allow you to change the amount of insulation that you need during your workout.
  • Cover your head. Your body loses about 50 percent of its heat if your head is uncovered at the freezing mark. Wearing a helmet or hat keeps that heat in and means you can stay outside much longer.
  • Wear gloves. In cold weather, your blood moves from your hands to the center of your body to keep your warm and protected. Wearing gloves will keep blood flowing to your hands and prevent cold-related tissue damage.
  • Always check the and wind chill before heading outdoors to exercise and dress appropriately. You're in danger if you have exposed skin when the wind chill (a combined effect of temperature and wind) falls below minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

More information: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about cold weather hazards and safety.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Hypothermia: Staying Safe in Cold Weather

Jan 15, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Frigid weather can pose special risks to older adults. The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, has some advice for helping older people avoid hypothermia -- when ...

Extreme cold snap brings unexpected health risks

Jan 24, 2013

(HealthDay)—As extreme cold blankets many parts of the United States, one expert warns that frigid temperatures can put people at greater risk not only for hypothermia and frostbite, but also for stroke, ...

Recommended for you

Smoking's toll on mentally ill analyzed

4 hours ago

Those in the United States with a mental illness diagnosis are much more likely to smoke cigarettes and smoke more heavily, and are less likely to quit smoking than those without mental illness, regardless ...

User comments