Risks associated with early-term delivery highlighted

Risks associated with early-term delivery highlighted

(HealthDay)—Non-medically indicated early-term delivery is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality, and interventions to reduce these deliveries are encouraged, according to a review published in the November issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Jani R. Jensen, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues discuss the neonatal and maternal consequences of early-term delivery and interventions to reduce these deliveries.

The authors note that neonatal mortality rates are significantly increased at 37 and 38 weeks versus 39 weeks (adjusted odds ratios, 1.9 and 1.4, respectively). Early delivery impacts the , with 1.9- and 1.3-fold higher cerebral palsy rates seen at 37 and 38 weeks, respectively, versus 39 to 41 weeks. Increases in the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Development Scale scores are seen with each additional week of gestation. Maternal complications include longer labor, more interventions during labor, and increased rates of Cesarean delivery, which is associated with underappreciated long-term sequelae. Many women are unaware of early-term delivery-associated risks and the age at which it is safe to deliver a baby; in one study, half of the women believed a full-term pregnancy occurred at 37 to 38 weeks. To decrease the number of non-medically indicated early-term deliveries, hospitals are using different approaches, including "hard-stop" policies, prohibiting this type of ; "soft-stop" approach, allowing individual physicians to decide on adherence; and education about associated risks—all of which can reduce early-term deliveries.

"Adoption and enforcement of policies to decrease the rate of elective early-term deliveries may reduce the frequency of these deliveries and, in turn, improve maternal and ," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Policy changes in elective delivery proven successful

date Feb 11, 2013

In a study to be presented on February 14 at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing changes in elective delivery ...

Recommended for you

Key to better sex ed: Focus on gender & power

date 18 hours ago

A new analysis by Population Council researcher Nicole Haberland provides powerful evidence that sexuality and HIV education programs addressing gender and power in intimate relationships are far more likely ...

Journal tackles aging policy issues raised by White House

date 18 hours ago

In anticipation of the forthcoming 2015 White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA), The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) has produced a special issue of The Gerontologist that outlines a vision for older adults' econom ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.