Risks associated with early-term delivery highlighted

Risks associated with early-term delivery highlighted

(HealthDay)—Non-medically indicated early-term delivery is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality, and interventions to reduce these deliveries are encouraged, according to a review published in the November issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Jani R. Jensen, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues discuss the neonatal and maternal consequences of early-term delivery and interventions to reduce these deliveries.

The authors note that neonatal mortality rates are significantly increased at 37 and 38 weeks versus 39 weeks (adjusted odds ratios, 1.9 and 1.4, respectively). Early delivery impacts the , with 1.9- and 1.3-fold higher cerebral palsy rates seen at 37 and 38 weeks, respectively, versus 39 to 41 weeks. Increases in the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Development Scale scores are seen with each additional week of gestation. Maternal complications include longer labor, more interventions during labor, and increased rates of Cesarean delivery, which is associated with underappreciated long-term sequelae. Many women are unaware of early-term delivery-associated risks and the age at which it is safe to deliver a baby; in one study, half of the women believed a full-term pregnancy occurred at 37 to 38 weeks. To decrease the number of non-medically indicated early-term deliveries, hospitals are using different approaches, including "hard-stop" policies, prohibiting this type of ; "soft-stop" approach, allowing individual physicians to decide on adherence; and education about associated risks—all of which can reduce early-term deliveries.

"Adoption and enforcement of policies to decrease the rate of elective early-term deliveries may reduce the frequency of these deliveries and, in turn, improve maternal and ," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Policy changes in elective delivery proven successful

Feb 11, 2013

In a study to be presented on February 14 at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Francisco, California, researchers will present data showing changes in elective delivery ...

Recommended for you

What doctors say to LGBT teens matters

16 minutes ago

When doctors speak to teens about sex and LGBT issues, only about 3 percent of them are doing so in a way that encourages LGBT teens to discuss their sexuality, and Purdue University researchers say other doctors can learn ...

Even without kids, couples eat frequent family meals

2 hours ago

Couples and other adult family members living without minors in the house are just as likely as adults living with young children or adolescents to eat family meals at home on most days of the week, new research suggests.

Health law enrollment now 7.3M

15 hours ago

The Obama administration says 7.3 million people have signed up for subsidized private health insurance under the health care law—down from 8 million reported earlier this year.

ASTRO issues second list of 'Choosing wisely' guidelines

16 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has released a second list of five radiation oncology-specific treatments that should be discussed before being prescribed, as part of the ...

User comments