Growing number of seniors caring for other seniors

January 7, 2014 by Matt Sedensky
In this Nov. 21, 2013, photo, Paul Gregoline rests in his favorite chair as caregiver Warren Manchess leaves the room, in Noblesville Ind. Burgeoning demand for senior services like home health aides is being met by a surprising segment of the workforce: Other seniors. Twenty-nine percent of so-called direct-care workers are projected to be 55 or older by 2018 and in some segments of that population older workers are the single largest age demographic. With high rates of turnover, home care agencies have shown a willingness to hire older people new to the field who have found a tough job market as they try to supplement their retirement income.(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Burgeoning demand for senior services like home health aides is being met by a surprising segment of the workforce: Other seniors.

Twenty-nine percent of so-called direct-care workers are projected to be 55 or older by 2018. And in some segments of that population, older workers are the single largest age demographic.

Though the jobs are among the fastest-growing in the U.S., they may seem a curious choice for for their physical demands, low pay and high rates of injury.

But with high rates of turnover, home care agencies have shown a willingness to hire new to the field who have found a tough job market as they try to supplement their retirement income.

Explore further: Older workers who drive top traffic death list, CDC reports

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