Toxic chemicals found in children's clothes, shoes, Greenpeace says

Greenpeace activists pretend they are sewing contaminated clothes with chemicals represented by little monsters, during a protest stunt in Budapest on January 14, 2014

Children's clothing and shoes made by a dozen globally-recognised brands have been found to contain potentially harmful chemicals, Greenpeace said Tuesday.

A new investigation by the environmental campaign group showed that at least one article from every brand was found to have chemicals that "can have adverse impacts either on human reproductive, hormonal or immune systems".

But some of the substances it tested were at concentrations as low as 1mg per kilo, which it described as "the limit of detection", and it was not clear from the statement how many of the samples were above official limits.

The campaign group has issued similar findings before, and in 2012 held a "toxic" fashion show in Beijing to draw attention to its allegation that two-thirds of high-street garments it tested contained .

Greenpeace analysed 82 products manufactured in 12 different countries, with China the biggest producer on 29.

"This is a nightmare for parents everywhere looking to buy clothes for their children that don't contain ," Greenpeace East Asia campaigner Chih An Lee said in a statement Tuesday.

"These chemical 'little monsters' can be found in everything from exclusive luxury designs to budget fashion, polluting our waterways from Beijing to Berlin," Lee added.

Of the products tested, 50 items, or 61 percent, were found to contain nonylphenol ethoxylates, or NPEs, which the group said can break down and become toxic "hormone disrupters".

High levels of PFOA, an ionic perfluorinated chemical that can cause reproductive harm, were also found on some products.

The campaign group said it tested products made by Adidas, American Apparel, Burberry, C&A, Disney, Gap, H&M, Li-Ning, Nike, Primark, Puma and Uniqlo.

The investigation follows previous efforts by Greenpeace to push clothing brands for "zero discharge of all hazardous materials" by 2020.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Greenpeace warns of chemicals in global fashion

Nov 20, 2012

Two-thirds of high-street garments tested in a study by Greenpeace contained potentially harmful chemicals, the group said Tuesday, highlighting the findings with a "toxic" fashion show in Beijing.

Nike, Adidas suppliers 'polluting China rivers'

Jul 13, 2011

Environmental campaigners on Wednesday accused suppliers to major clothing brands including Adidas and Nike of poisoning China's major rivers with hazardous chemicals linked to hormonal problems.

Recommended for you

Older women restrict driving more than older men

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Older women restrict their driving activity more than older men, regardless of physical health or cognitive status, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of th ...

Alcohol apps aimed at young

13 hours ago

Apps with names like 'Let's get Wasted!' and 'Drink Thin' have led a James Cook University Professor to call for Government action on alcohol advertising on mobile devices.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.