CDC: More Americans getting blood pressure under control

CDC: more americans getting blood pressure under control

(HealthDay)—According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about two-thirds (64 percent) of people with high blood pressure had the condition under control during 2012, the latest year for which figures are available. The report is published in the Feb. 14 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

The agency defined controlled blood pressure as readings at or below 140 mm Hg/90 mm Hg. The report is based on 2012 data from the nationwide Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set, which covers more than 113 million Americans enrolled in a range of health care plans. The CDC report found there were "modest" improvements in how many Americans got their high blood pressure under control, compared to 2010. However, rates varied widely by region, with the southeastern "Stroke Belt" states lagging behind.

For example, while more than 68 percent of people reporting to the HHS' San Francisco data center had their under control, that number dropped to just 59.5 percent for people reporting to the Atlanta or Dallas centers, the CDC said.

"Hypertension is a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease and as a medical community it is imperative that we aggressively screen and treat those patients with ," Suzanne Steinbaum, M.D., preventive cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, told HealthDay. "Not only do we need to implement awareness campaigns for the patients, but hold the physicians to clinical standards of treatment," she said. "It is crucial that these goals are met in order for us to save lives, and prevent Americans from suffering from heart disease and strokes."

More information: Full Article
More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Too few Americans aware of their high blood pressure

Dec 24, 2013

(HealthDay)—High blood pressure is a preventable and treatable risk factor for heart attack and stroke, but about one-quarter of adults don't know they have it, according to a large new study.

Recommended for you

Tooth loss linked to slowing mind and body

10 hours ago

The memory and walking speeds of adults who have lost all of their teeth decline more rapidly than in those who still have some of their own teeth, finds new UCL research.

Hot flashes linked to increased risk of hip fracture

14 hours ago

Women who experience moderate to severe hot flashes and night sweats during menopause tend to have lower bone mineral density and higher rates of hip fracture than peers who do not have menopausal symptoms, according to a ...

Core hospital care team members may surprise you

14 hours ago

Doctors and nurses are traditionally thought to be the primary caretakers of patients in a typical hospital setting. But according to a study at the burn center intensive care unit at Loyola University Health System, three ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.