Stroke survivors often return to driving without being evaluated for ability

Stroke survivors often resume driving without being formally evaluated for ability—though stroke can cause deficits that can impair driving, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2014.

Researchers surveyed 162 a year after their strokes and found:

  • More than 51 percent returned to driving—many a month after suffering a .
  • Only 5.6 percent received a formal driving evaluation.
  • Eleven percent of those who returned to driving reported their strokes had greatly impacted their abilities to perform important life activities.
  • Among those who returned to driving and reported no effect on their abilities to perform important life activities, more than 45 percent limited their driving.

Researchers suggest stroke survivors may benefit from formal evaluation before resuming driving.

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