Stroke survivors often return to driving without being evaluated for ability

Stroke survivors often resume driving without being formally evaluated for ability—though stroke can cause deficits that can impair driving, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2014.

Researchers surveyed 162 a year after their strokes and found:

  • More than 51 percent returned to driving—many a month after suffering a .
  • Only 5.6 percent received a formal driving evaluation.
  • Eleven percent of those who returned to driving reported their strokes had greatly impacted their abilities to perform important life activities.
  • Among those who returned to driving and reported no effect on their abilities to perform important life activities, more than 45 percent limited their driving.

Researchers suggest stroke survivors may benefit from formal evaluation before resuming driving.

Related Stories

Sleep apnea common among stroke-related brainstem injuries

date Feb 12, 2014

People whose brainstems are affected by their stroke have a significantly higher prevalence of sleep apnea than those who have stroke-related injury elsewhere in the brain, according to research presented at the American ...

Recommended for you

Cognitive impairment predicts worse outcome in heart failure

date May 24, 2015

Cognitive impairment predicts worse outcome in elderly heart failure patients, reveals research presented today at Heart Failure 2015 by Hiroshi Saito, a physiotherapist at Kameda Medical Centre in Kamogawa, Japan. Patients ...

1950s drug is future heart treatment

date May 22, 2015

Oxford University researchers have found a promising future treatment for heart disease, going back to a drug first developed in 1950.

Time is muscle in acute heart failure

date May 21, 2015

Urgent diagnosis and treatment in acute heart failure has been emphasised for the first time in joint recommendations published today in European Heart Journal.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.