Drop in compensation gap for primary care docs, specialists

Drop in compensation gap for primary care docs, specialists

(HealthDay)—From 2012 to 2013, there was a 5.7 percent increase in the median total cash compensation for primary care physicians, with a smaller gap seen for medical and surgical specialists, according to the results of a recent survey from SullivanCotter.

The survey reported data from 484 organizations covering 91,000 . Cash compensation data were included for 230 physicians, Ph.D., and advanced practice clinician specialties, and for eight medical group executive positions.

According to the report, there was a 5.7 percent overall increase of median total for between 2012 and 2013. During the same timeframe, medical and surgical specialists had increases of 3.2 and 2.3 percent. In an approach that allowed performance-metrics such as quality to be part of the physician compensation model, in 2013, the overall median amount paid for quality was $15,000, but this ranged from $7,000 for primary care to $20,000 for medical and surgical specialties. The amount paid for quality represented 5 percent of the total cash compensation.

"For many years, our survey results have shown a widening gap in the pay relationships between primary care physicians and specialists. The results from our 2013 survey demonstrate a slight shift in the market and these pay relationships," Kim Mobley, the managing principal and national physician compensation practice leader at SullivanCotter, said in a statement. "This is consistent with the ever-increasing labor market demand for physicians."

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Report reveals payment methods for physicians

Jan 30, 2014

(HealthDay)—Many physicians in non-solo practice settings are paid using different methods, with just over half receiving all or most of their compensation from salary, according to a report from the American ...

US adults want physicians managing their health care

Dec 24, 2013

(HealthDay)—U.S. adults prefer physicians to non-physicians for health care and would choose a physician to lead their medical team, according to the results of a survey commissioned by the American Academy ...

Recommended for you

Patient-centered medical homes reduce costs

13 hours ago

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH), introduced in 2007, is a model of health care that emphasizes personal relationships, team delivery of care, coordination across specialties and care settings, quality ...

New mums still excessively sleepy after four months

14 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—New mums are being urged to be cautious about returning to work too quickly, after a QUT study found one in two were still excessively sleepy four months after giving birth.

It's time to address the health of men around the world

14 hours ago

All over the world, men die younger than women and do worse on a host of health indicators, yet policy makers rarely focus on this "men's health gap" or adopt programs aimed at addressing it, according to an international ...

User comments