Kids learn stroke signs in class through imitation

March 23, 2014 by Jim Fitzgerald

A program in New York that teaches children about strokes includes having the kids imitate some of the telltale signs.

So at a recent class, third-graders spoke in gibberish and tried to make droopy smiles.

The program at Montefiore Medical Center is meant to recruit the youngsters to help get into treatment as quickly as possible.

The children had fun, but they knew it was a serious lesson. One girl said she now knows what to do if her mother suffers a .

The head of the National Stroke Association says most people who suffer strokes don't get to a hospital quickly enough to benefit from the best treatment. He says it's possible the children will save lives from knowing what to look for and what to do.

Explore further: Video game teaches kids about stroke symptoms and calling 9-1-1

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