Florida university opens TB lab in Haiti

The University of Florida on Wednesday opened a state-of-the-art lab in Haiti to train researchers to better understand and fight tuberculosis.

The 1,500 square-feet (139 square-meters) facility will bring graduate students from outside Haiti to train Haitian technicians, who will then go on to work at the national laboratory, said Dr. Michael Lauzardo, division chief of Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

There are only three other TB labs in Haiti and more are greatly needed.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that Haiti has the highest rate of TB in the hemisphere, and that nearly 40 percent of the people with TB go undiagnosed. The World Health Organization says that of every 100,000 in Haiti, people 296 of them have TB.

The UF lab was built for less than $150,000 and is housed in a compound west of the Port-au-Prince capital.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

HIV rates in Haiti drop over decade

Dec 01, 2013

The U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince says the number of Haitians who have tested positive for HIV has declined over the past decade.

Recommended for you

Cochrane Review of RDT for diagnosis of drug resistant TB

10 minutes ago

Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, hosted at LSTM, have conducted an independent review to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the GenoType MTBDRsl assay for the detection of resistance ...

Africans in New York complain of Ebola stigma

4 hours ago

Members of the west African community in New York complained Wednesday that their children were being bullied at school and businesses were losing money because of hysteria over Ebola.

Ebola expert says China at risk, seeks Japan aid

4 hours ago

A scientist who helped to discover the Ebola virus says he is concerned that the disease could spread to China given the large numbers of Chinese workers traveling to and from Africa.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.