Treatment of complex developmental trauma in children and youth

Children and adolescents in foster care and institutional settings often face complex developmental trauma related to multiple or continuous traumatic experiences. However, successful clinical interventions are difficult to implement because of barriers to accessibility, time constraints, insufficient diagnostic criteria, and other limitations. A new, open access study in Child & Youth Services explores the benefits of Trust-Based Relational Intervention (TBRI), a program designed for caregivers working closely with traumatized children.

Developed at the Texas Christian University Institute of Child Development, TBRI trains caregivers in building safe, nurturing environments and responding effectively to behavioral issues. TBRI assumes that caregiver training is essential to improving the child's response to everyday challenges and uses the guiding principles of empowerment, connection, and correction to enable positive development. Unlike traditional clinical interventions, TBRI is adaptable to multiple environments and provides programming for a variety of structural and relational needs, including nutrition, physical activity, relationship-building, and caregiver response.

The authors, led by Karyn Purvis, PhD, describe the benefits of the intervention: "Holistic in nature, cost effective to implement, and developmentally respectful of the impact of trauma, TBRI appears to hold significant potential for creating positive impact in the lives of and youth who have come from the hard places." TRBI is a promising program for children and youth who cannot access clinical care or who require a greater level of support in their daily environment. In its unique design, TBRI is one of the only programs effective in treating complex developmental trauma, as opposed to acute trauma, in children and youth.

More information: "Trust-Based Relational Intervention (TBRI): A Systemic Approach to Complex Developmental Trauma." Karyn B. Purvis, David R. Cross, Donald F. Dansereau & Sheri R. Parris. Child & Youth Services, Volume 34, Issue 4, 2013. pages 360-386, DOI: 10.1080/0145935X.2013.859906

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Rural versus urban causes of childhood concussion

Mar 31, 2014

Researchers at Western University (London, Canada) have found youth living in rural areas are more likely to sustain concussions from injuries involving motorized vehicles such as all-terrain vehicles and dirt bikes, whereas ...

Recommended for you

Reading 'Fifty Shades' linked to unhealthy behaviors

23 minutes ago

Young adult women who read "Fifty Shades of Grey" are more likely than nonreaders to exhibit signs of eating disorders and have a verbally abusive partner, finds a new study led by a Michigan State University ...

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us

3 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us - they are more extroverted, agreeable and open - attributes that make them successful in the demanding, fast-paced and often stressful environment ...

Many patients don't understand electronic lab results

3 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—While it's becoming commonplace for patients to see the results of lab work electronically, a new University of Michigan study suggests that many people may not be able to understand what ...

Healthier foods available in neighborhoods

4 hours ago

Changes to the federal food assistance program for low-income women and their children improved the availability of healthy foods at small and medium-size stores in New Orleans, according to research from ...

User comments