Video: Air moisture making allergies worse indoors and outdoors

April 10, 2014 by Stasia Thompson

As the snowy winter of 2014 winds down, Loyola allergy specialist Dr. Joseph Leija tells WJOL radio that the Midwest will likely see high counts for mold and pollen this year. Allergy symptoms seem like they're at their the worst in the spring because that's the first time that allergy sufferers are exposed to the environment when the trees are pollinating, he said.

Moisture in the air will be a problem for both indoors and outdoors. If you have allergies, it's important to control your environment, including covering pillows and mattresses to reduce the effects of mold and dust mites, Dr. Leija said. People who use humidifiers in their homes often make their allergies worse, he said. It's better to keep your air conditioning running at home with your windows closed.

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Explore further: Midwest mold count peaks due to extreme heat, storms

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