Erectile dysfunction is not the only sexual problem for men living with diabetes

May 20, 2014

Lack of erection is the most commonly known disorder as an effect of diabetes on the function of the male reproductive organ; however, is not the only one, and therefore it is important to know other affections to men's sexual health.

For example, lack of orgasm is recognized as anorgasmia, ie, lack of sensation at the time of ejaculation which can also occur from , according to José Jaime Martinez Salgado, clinical sexologist of the Mexican Institute of Sexology.

"In advanced stages, the disease causes the arteries to harden and nerve terminals to suffer atrophy, so the way the body experiments sensations completely changes."

The therapist also adds that the person with diabetes may have affected sensitivity, "as can happen with the orgasmic sensation being altered because of a problem in the nervous system."

Martínez Salgado says. "An orgasm is not the same as an ejaculation, because it refers only to the expulsion of semen. Male orgasm is associated with contractions that occur internally from the prostate (gland that produces seminal fluid) and through the channel through which the sperm is ejected, which is what really gives the feeling of pleasure. In general, both processes occur simultaneously, but can also be given separately . "

However, anejaculation (lack of ejaculation) is rare compared with occurance of sexual disorders like and erectile dysfunction, it may occur in between one and four percent of men, and in some cases the effect of diabetes.

Sexologists say that, on average, it takes between 2 and 4 minutes to a man to ejaculate after being in active movement after penetration; however, those with late ejaculation or anejaculation, face impossible to do so or achieve it after making a great effort and a prolonged sexual relationship (from 30 to 45 minutes).

The same experts estimate that excess blood in sugar damages some nerve terminations in the male sexual apparatus, causing sphincters to not open nor close properly according to certain stimuli.

When ejaculation is not achieved, some or all of the semen goes into the bladder instead of being expelled through the penis; there, it gets mixed with urine and is eliminated from the body during urination.

In addition to treatments for diabetes, man can consider medication to improve the muscle tone of the bladder's neck. As can be understood, lack of ejaculation will result in the inability to achieve pregnancy, but there are artificial insemination techniques that can help solve the problem efficiently.

The risk of suffering sexual problems can be reduced by keeping the glucose levels as close to normal as possible; the same should be considered with blood pressure and cholesterol. Equally important is regular physical activity and maintaining proper weight.

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