ESPID: Flu vaccine in pregnancy doesn't affect infant growth

ESPID: flu vaccine in pregnancy doesn't affect infant growth

(HealthDay)—Vaccination with the H1N1 influenza vaccine Focetria during pregnancy has no adverse effects on infant health, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases, held from May 6 to 10 in Dublin.

Nicoline van der Maas, M.D., from the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in Bilthoven, Netherlands, and colleagues examined possible of the Focetria vaccine, given to Dutch women in the second and third trimester of pregnancy, on . Data were collected for the first year of life for infant growth and development (1,739 ) and for infant-related contacts with the general practitioner (GP; 1,671 infants).

The researchers found that infants of vaccinated and unvaccinated mothers did not differ in z-score for weight-for-age, length-for-age, and head circumference. There was also no difference in a developmental score based on age-specific assessments of fine and coarse motor function, speech, language, and psychosocial aspects. The number of infection-related GP-contacts was not different between the groups (incidence rate ratio, 1.07; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.28).

"These findings are reassuring for [the] public and professionals and may help the decision making process on maternal immunization in case of a new pandemic and possible other infectious diseases, which can be prevented by this strategy," van der Maas said in a statement.

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Many infants still not placed on their backs to sleep

May 03, 2014

Since 1994, parents have been urged to put their babies to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). It appears many caregivers have not gotten the message, and health care providers ...

Fighting flu in newborns begins in pregnancy

Dec 14, 2010

A three-year study by Yale School of Medicine researchers has found that vaccinating pregnant women against influenza is over 90 percent effective in preventing their infants from being hospitalized with influenza in the ...

Recommended for you

Ob-gyn guidance issued for young cancer patient concerns

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Young cancer patients and survivors may have gynecologic concerns, which should be managed before, during, and after treatment, according to a Committee Opinion published in the August issue ...

Common blood thinner for pregnant women proven ineffective

Jul 24, 2014

It's a daily injection to the belly for pregnant women at risk of developing blood clots and it's ineffective, according to a clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and published today by the prestigious ...

Improving life before it begins

Jul 22, 2014

A group of Mexican specialists in fetal medicine have successfully performed over 200 surgeries on unborn babies, inside the womb of the mother. Doctors, grouped under the signature Fetal Medicine Mexico, ...

User comments