In pools, young blacks drown at far higher rates

by Mike Stobbe

A new study shows swimming pools are a much greater danger to black children and teens than they are to other kids.

The report found ages 5 to 19 drowned in at a rate more than five times that of . Previous research has suggested that's because fewer blacks know how to swim.

The differences were smaller in lakes or other bodies of water. Experts think that's because relatively few blacks go boating or participate in other water activities.

Drowning is a major cause of death in children and young adults. The new report was released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More information: CDC report: www.cdc.gov/mmwr

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