Egypt's army says 'virus cure' needs more tests

by Mariam Rizk
This file image made from undated video broadcast on Egyptian State Television on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014 shows a device that the Egyptian army claims will detect and cure AIDS and Hepatitis. Egypt's military said Saturday, June 28, 2014 that devices it earlier claimed it invented to detect and cure AIDS and hepatitis C need six more months of testing. The army had earlier promised to reveal the technology to the public this coming Monday after making what experts dismissed as an outlandish claim last February. (AP Photo, File)

Egypt's military said Saturday that a device it claimed it invented to cure AIDS and hepatitis C needs six more months of testing.

The army had earlier promised to reveal the technology to the public this coming Monday after making what experts dismissed as an outlandish claim last February.

At a news conference then, the head of the army's Engineering Agency said the military had produced an "astonishing, miraculous" set of inventions that could detect AIDS, and other viruses without taking and also purify the blood of those suffering from the diseases.

The claim caused uproar among scientists and the public, with many pointing out that the technology had not been properly verified. It was also lampooned in a famous satirical program that has now been taken off the air.

The assertion hit a sensitive nerve in Egypt, where Hepatitis C is an epidemic. Some studies estimate that up to 10 percent of 86 million Egyptians have it, making it the country with the highest prevalence in the world.

In a press conference held in a military hospital in Cairo Saturday, a military doctor said the blood purification device needed further tests before it could be released to the public.

This file image made from undated video broadcast on Egyptian State Television on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014 shows a device that the Egyptian army claims will detect and cure AIDS and Hepatitis. Egypt's military said Saturday, June 28, 2014 that devices it earlier claimed it invented to detect and cure AIDS and hepatitis C need six more months of testing. The army had earlier promised to reveal the technology to the public this coming Monday after making what experts dismissed as an outlandish claim last February. (AP Photo, File)

"Scientific integrity mandates that I delay the start of the public release until the experimentation period is over, to allow for a follow up with patients already using it," Egypt's state news agency MENA quoted Maj. Gen. Gamal el-Serafy, director of the Armed Forces Medical Department, as saying.

El-Serafy said doctors had already started testing one of the machines, the so-called "Complete Cure Device," on 80 Hepatitis C patients who were also being treated with medication.

Saturday's news conference notably dropped any mention of the device as a cure for AIDS, only referring to hepatitis. None of the research involved has been published in a reputable journal.

The original claim in February raised concerns that the military's offer of seemingly inconceivable future devices would draw Egypt back into a pattern of broken promises by successive rulers who would frequently announce grand initiatives that failed to meet expectations.

Generals working on the project and pro-military media adopted a defensive stance over the matter, insisting that the inventions would be released to the public and that any criticism of them was part of a foreign plot to rob Egypt of a major scientific victory.

El-Serafy said the armed forces will set up a medical center to treat the viruses in the Suez Canal province of Ismailia to carry out the tests and declare results.

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alfie_null
3 / 5 (2) Jun 29, 2014
Six more months to figure out how to put the right spin on this.
Nik_2213
5 / 5 (1) Jun 29, 2014
Gosh, doesn't it look just like those totally fake bomb detectors that earned their heartless UK exporter £multi-millions in sales & kick-backs plus a hefty jail-term for international fraud...
Returners
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 29, 2014
Shiha said the C-Fast uses electromagnetic frequencies similar to those used in bomb detectors and radars and had been tested on more than 2,000 patients with a high success rate.


If this is true, they are morally obligated, by an Oath to publish.

Imagine just being able to scan patients like that. If you get a positive result for anything, you know what to blood test, possibly in addition to what you thought you should test.

Some viruses could be in your sweat, saliva, or mucus, so I can see how a scanner could potentially identify them by scanning your mouth and nose area, and by scanning your sweat, but what about "internal" viruses.

How is he detecting Hepatitis, with a surface scan, since it's mainly in the liver?

Well, he said "EM" radiation, so there may be more than one spectra involved int the scan, both visible and non-visible spectra I guess.

If this is true, it's going to be the best medical scanner ever.
Returners
1 / 5 (3) Jun 29, 2014
You're not supposed to go to the ER for a cold or flu unless it's a REAL life or death case, but people do it anyway.

Imagine if the tech or nurse on duty at the desk can just whip out a hand-held scanner and tell whether the patient has the Cold, the Flu, some other virus, or hey, it's not a virus at all, it's strep...

No blood test, no swabbing...well you could do that anyway as a backup test, but you could start the correct treatment immediately, without waiting on blood or saliva tests.

I'm assuming the device is a radically advanced spectrometer, which is looking for the specific spectral signature of specific proteins, genes, or other byproducts from the Viruses.

The photos imply they are detecting from a meter or two away.

So it would apparently work on the emission spectra of the viral protein capsule or it's genes, or byproducts as mentioned. I assume they tested these repeatedly to get baselines in a lab, and then made the device to look for it in people (or animals).
Returners
1 / 5 (3) Jun 29, 2014
Guys, this claim is really shocking.

I hope it's true, but it's probably not, but if this is true this is the biggest advancement in pathology since Louis Pasteur...

Seriously, imagine if it can look for HPV and other cancer causing viruses.

Imagine stopping Ebola outbreaks instantly (it's on the surface in the sweat), by simply scanning and quarantining everyone who turns up positive.

The applications in farming...

A sick herd or flock (china especially) you could scan every bird and cull ONLY the infected ones. Blood tests would be ridiculously impractical, but a hand-held scanner that needs no blood test?!

Do you have any idea how much money that would save in even one outbreak of Avian Flu?

It's insane how much potential economic benefits this has even outside human medicine...
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 29, 2014
"Egypt's military said Saturday that a device it claimed it invented to cure AIDS and hepatitis C needs six more months of testing."

-Well if the religionists were still in power I would figure they had just found a new use for their AKMs. They are busy elsewhere curing xians, Shiites, and even Sunnis less zealous than they.

Hey Lrrkrr you've been posting every 5 min or so, pretty much nonstop since early this morning. You've already admitted you've doubled up on your pain meds in addition to all the other pharmaceuticals you've been taking. Your delusional rantings are revealing just how out of control you are.

How soon before you hit bottom? If you suddenly disappear again we can assume 1) you got banned again or 2) you ran out of pain meds or 3) you're in rehab or 4) you're on a slab in the morgue.

Which of these is more favorable to you? The longer you go, the sooner you're gonna be #4. And nobody here will know or care.

Quick! Better publish before you die. Get going!
Nik_2213
5 / 5 (1) Jun 30, 2014
Folks, look at these piccies --A pretty handle, a swivel and a telescopic antenna.

Now 'Google Images' for 'fake bomb detector'.

Note their so-similar handle, swivel and telescopic antenna....

If you're still a believer, may I sell you London Bridge, a snake-oil well and a cure for old age ??

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