Many STDs may go undiagnosed, US report finds

June 10, 2014
Many STDs may go undiagnosed, U.S. report finds
Nearly 2 million Americans have chlamydia infection, but about 400,000 don't know it, government estimates.

(HealthDay)—About 400,000 Americans may have the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia, but not know they have it, new research suggests.

The new government report estimates that 1.8 million people in the United States have , but that only 1.4 million infections have been reported.

Women, particularly young women, seem to have an even greater risk of harboring this often symptomless infection, according to the U.S. National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention news release.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2007 to 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and found that 1.7 percent of men and women aged 14 to 39 have chlamydia, which works out to about 1.8 million infections in the United States. However, only about 1.4 million chlamydia infections are reported each year, which indicates that many chlamydia infections go undiagnosed, the researchers said.

The rate is highest among sexually active girls aged 14 to 19, at 6.4 percent, the investigators found. The rate among sexually active boys aged 14 to 19 is 2.4 percent.

The study also found significant . For example, the rate among sexually active black teen girls is 18.6 percent, compared with 3.2 percent among sexually active white teen girls.

The findings show the importance of screening all sexually active teen girls for chlamydia in order to ensure that all those who are infected get diagnosed and treated, the researchers said.

They added that the racial differences they discovered show the need for targeted interventions, particularly among black teen girls.

The study was scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the STD Prevention Conference in Atlanta.

Explore further: Not enough young women getting tested for chlamydia: CDC

More information: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about chlamydia.

Related Stories

Not enough young women getting tested for chlamydia: CDC

March 13, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Far too few sexually active young women are getting tested for chlamydia, an oversight that could lead them down a perilous path to severe health consequences, including infertility, later in life.

Teens, young adults bear disproportionate share of STDs

April 28, 2013

In the heat of the moment, it's a good bet sexually transmitted infections are the last thing on a teen's or young adult's mind. Thus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, young people ages ...

More STD screening on horizon for women?

April 28, 2014

(HealthDay)—A federal task force is poised to advise doctors to regularly screen all sexually active American women and girls up to age 24 for the sexually transmitted diseases chlamydia and gonorrhea, which often don't ...

Recommended for you

Zika virus may persist in the vagina days after infection

August 25, 2016

The Zika virus reproduces in the vaginal tissue of pregnant mice several days after infection, according to a study by Yale researchers. From the genitals, the virus spreads and infects the fetal brain, impairing fetal development. ...

In sub-Saharan Africa, cancer can be an infectious disease

August 26, 2016

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. Epstein, an expert in chicken viruses and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.