University patents new diagnostic technique for early detection of multiple conditions

University patents new diagnostic technique
The water soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe in cells.

A team led by Professor Tony James and Dr Steve Bull from our Department of Chemistry has patented a technique they hope will help with the early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

The key to their research is the detection of the chemical peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is associated with many diseases but is difficult to detect as it is so short-lived.

The team began by using a water soluble fluorescence probe to successfully detect peroxynitrite in . They are now hoping to use this technique as the basis for tests for the of other diseases.

Their paper on their research – A water soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite and imaging in living cells – has just been published in Chemical Science, a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

The team from our Department of Chemistry is made up of Professor James, Drs Steve Bull, Stephen Flower, John Lowe and Mr Xiaolong Sun. They are joined on this project by Dr John Fossey from the University of Birmingham, Qingling Xu, Gyoungmi Kim and Juyoung Yoon from Ewha Woman's University and Xu- Hong Qian from East China University of Science and Technology.

Professor James said: "Our research into the detection of peroxynitrite has the potential to change the way these diseases are diagnosed. We are excited by the impact this could have on people's lives.

"We are very grateful to Phil Brown from our Research Development Support Office for helping with the Patent Application."

More information: pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articl… f/2014/sc/c4sc01417k

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Survival differences seen for advanced-stage laryngeal cancer

15 hours ago

The five-year survival rate for advanced-stage laryngeal cancer was higher than national levels in a small study at a single academic center performing a high rate of surgical therapy, including a total laryngectomy (removal ...

Gene test aids cancer profile

Nov 27, 2014

The first round of chemotherapy did little to suppress Ron Bose's leukemia. The second round, with 10 times the dose, knocked the proliferating blast cells down, but only by half.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.