Maternal obesity modulates offspring microflora composition and gastrointestinal functions

July 30, 2014

Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, finds that maternal obesity leads to marked changes in the offspring's gastrointestinal microflora composition and gastrointestinal function.

The gastrointestinal microflora consists of multiple species of microorganisms that live in the digestive tracts of animals and assists the host in digestion. An imbalance in an individual's microflora is suspected to contribute to the development and persistence of obesity. An increase in firmicutes to bacteriodetes ratio is a trademark of obesity and is linked to an increase in gastrointestinal permeability, systemic inflammation and weight gain. Results from this new study show that the "obese" microflora may be passed from a mother to offspring. In rodents, offspring from exhibited an increase in firmicutes to bacteriodetes ratio and an increase in gastrointestinal permeability. This is a unique finding because it suggests that there are non-genetic factors that could be passed from a mother to offspring to increase the susceptibility to obesity.

Today about 30% of women entering pregnancy are obese and their children are at greater risk for and associated metabolic disorders. "Modulation of microflora composition is fairly easy and non-invasive and may be of benefit for these children," says Dr. de la Serre. Her research team will continue these studies to investigate whether this may be a viable treatment option and promote the health of the offspring.

Explore further: Obese mums may pass health risks on to grandchildren

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Diagnoses: When are several opinions better than one?

July 22, 2016

Methods of collective intelligence can result in considerably more accurate medical diagnoses, but only under certain conditions. A study headed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development has shed new ...

Clock controls junk food appeal

July 22, 2016

When it comes to extra kilojoules, a little more self-restraint won't go astray as the day progresses. New research from Flinders University and Liverpool University has studied the urge to snack more later in the day, even ...

How to increase the fat burned during exercise

July 19, 2016

During exercise, oxidation of fat and carbohydrates depends on the intensity and duration of the activity. A new study analyses the effect of consuming an alkaloid, p-synephrine, on the burning of lipids and refutes the value ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.