Neurocognitive deficits seen within days of T1DM diagnosis

July 8, 2014
Neurocognitive deficits seen within days of T1DM diagnosis

(HealthDay)—Deficits in neurocognitive functioning are evident within days of a type 1 diabetes diagnosis in children and are associated with glycemic control over one year postdiagnosis, according to a study published online June 26 in Diabetes Care.

David D. Schwartz, from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues conducted neuropsychological testing among 147 children/adolescents (aged 5 to 18 years) during their inpatient hospitalization for new-onset . Comparisons were made to normative data, and they examined associations between neurocognitive performance at diagnosis and one year postdiagnosis.

The researchers found that on most cognitive measures, children with type 1 diabetes performed significantly below expectations (P values < 0.0001). Specifically, large decrements were seen in psychomotor speed, visuomotor integration, and phonemic fluency, compared to the normative mean. All tasks except digit span showed a high incidence of impairment (scores less than second percentile). When controlling for race/ethnicity, sex, and reading ability there was a significant association between dominant-hand psychomotor speed and (hemoglobin A1c ≥9.5 percent [80 mmol/mol]; P = 0.032) one year postdiagnosis. There was a 0.77 percent increase in mean hemoglobin A1c in association with impaired psychomotor speed.

"Psychomotor impairment may be an early marker for a broader neurobehavioral vulnerability that has implications for long-term diabetes management," the authors write.

Explore further: Routine blood glucose measurements can accurately estimate hemoglobin A1c in diabetes

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