Colorado considers a new look for edible pot

by Kristen Wyatt

(AP)—Marijuana-infused brownies and other treats for sale in Colorado come with all kinds of warning labels.

But now regulators are considering new rules to make those intoxicating treats look different even when they're out of the packages.

A panel of marijuana industry advocates and regulators starts work Friday on new regulations for pot-infused foods and drinks. The regulators are trying to figure out whether to stamp or mark edible pot so that children and others will know whether the treat contains pot.

Colorado, which has legalized the recreational use of marijuana, has a new edibles law that requires products to be shaped, stamped or colored to show they contain pot. But the law says the marking is required only when practicable. So it's unclear how the rule could apply to items such as a -infused liquid or granola.

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