Duke University

Duke University located in the Research Triangle of Durham, North Carolina traces its roots to 1838 when it was founded by Quakers and Methodists in Trinity, NC. Duke has more than 13,000 undergraduate and graduate students and professional degree students enrolled in its private university. Duke Medical School, School of Engineering, and the School of the Environment are rated very high nationally and internationally. Biomedical research is a very strong point for Duke and its discoveries come in rapid succession. Duke is well funded by endowments, grants and an exceptionally generous alumni.

Address
615 Chapel Drive, Box 90563, Durham, NC 27708-0563
E-mail
dukenews@duke.edu
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Genetic clue points to most vulnerable children

Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among ...

Jan 06, 2015
popularity 5 / 5 (2) | comments 1

Researchers map direct gut-brain connection

After each one of those big meals you ate over the holidays, the cells lining your stomach and intestines released hormones into the bloodstream to signal the brain that you were full and should stop eating.

Jan 06, 2015
popularity 4.9 / 5 (16) | comments 2

Seniors draw on extra brainpower for shopping

(Medical Xpress)—Holiday shopping can be mentally exhausting for anyone. But a new Duke University study finds that older adults seem to need extra brainpower to make shopping decisions—especially ones ...

Nov 18, 2014
popularity 4.5 / 5 (2) | comments 0

Credit score can also describe health status

A credit score doesn't just reduce a person's entire financial history down to a single number and somehow predict their credit-worthiness. It might also be saying something about a person's health status, ...

Nov 17, 2014
popularity 3.3 / 5 (3) | comments 4

How cartilage cells sense forceful injury

We live with the same cartilage—the tissue that connects our joints—for a lifetime. And since we can't readily make new cartilage cells, we had better figure out how to keep what we have healthy.

Nov 10, 2014
popularity 4.2 / 5 (6) | comments 0