News tagged with cell receptor

Psychology professor examines the taste system

What we view as the sense of taste is actually a combination of smell, taste and texture, with smell playing a major role. A single taste bud can have dozens of receptor cells that send signals of sour, sweet, salty and bitter ...

Feb 23, 2015
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Toward more targeted cancer vaccines

Scientists from Cardiff have used powerful X-ray technology to visualise how white blood cells interact with skin cancer cells, paving the way for the development of more accurate cancer vaccines.

Feb 17, 2015
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Researchers prevent type 1 diabetes in lab

In new research published in Endocrinology, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacological and physiological science at Saint Louis University, reports that his team has found a way to prevent type I diab ...

Jan 20, 2015
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Terpenes inhibit liver cancer

As main component of essential oils, terpenes can inhibit the growth of different cancer cells. Researchers from the Ruhr-University Bochum headed by Prof Dr Dr Dr Hanns Hatt have analysed this process in ...

Jan 19, 2015
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T cell receptor ensures Treg functionality

Misdirected immune responses that target the body's own tissue can result in diseases. regulatory T cells combat this effect by suppressing excessive immune responses and responses against our own bodies. ...

Jan 08, 2015
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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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