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Dehydration can lead to serious complications

Dehydration occurs when you use or lose more fluid than you take in, and your body doesn't have enough water and other fluids to carry out its normal functions. If you don't replace lost fluids, you will get dehydrated.

Sep 16, 2016
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A patent to prevent dehydration

Preventing dehydration is simple. Drink fluids, and plenty of them. But dehydration has a way of sneaking up on you, especially during the warmer summer months, and it can be hazardous when it does. For the average person, ...

Jul 14, 2016
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Study finds hockey players often underhydrated

One might not think of hockey as a sport that tends to cause dehydration in its players. But a University of Kansas study shows that not only are hockey players at high risk of dehydration, but plans specifically designed ...

Mar 03, 2016
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In physiology and medicine, dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as the excessive loss of body fluid. It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ὕδωρ hýdōr) from an object; however, in physiological terms, it entails a deficiency of fluid within an organism. Dehydration of skin and mucous membranes can be called medical dryness.

There are three types of dehydration: hypotonic or hyponatremic (primarily a loss of electrolytes, sodium in particular), hypertonic or hypernatremic (primarily a loss of water), and isotonic or isonatremic (equal loss of water and electrolytes). In humans, the most commonly seen type of dehydration by far is isotonic (isonatraemic) dehydration which effectively equates with hypovolemia, but the distinction of isotonic from hypotonic or hypertonic dehydration may be important when treating people who become dehydrated. Physiologically, dehydration, despite the name, does not simply mean loss of water, as water and solutes (mainly sodium) are usually lost in roughly equal quantities to how they exist in blood plasma. In hypotonic dehydration, intravascular water shifts to the extravascular space, exaggerating intravascular volume depletion for a given amount of total body water loss. Neurological complications can occur in hypotonic and hypertonic states. The former can lead to seizures, while the latter can lead to osmotic cerebral edema upon rapid rehydration.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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