News tagged with etoricoxib

Pain relief can now be based on solid evidence

A Cochrane Review of data relating to about 45,000 patients involved in approximately 350 individual studies has provided an evaluation of the effect you can expect to get if you take commonly used painkillers at specific ...

Sep 07, 2011
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Etoricoxib

Etoricoxib (brand name'NUSHINMASCOT HEALTH SERIES Arcoxia worldwide; also Algix and Tauxib in Italy, Etosaid in India) is a COX-2 selective inhibitor (approx. 106.0 times more selective for COX-2 inhibition over COX-1) from Merck & Co. Currently it is approved in more than 70 countries worldwide but not in the US, where the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires additional safety and efficacy data for etoricoxib before it will issue approval. Current therapeutic indications are: treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic low back pain, acute pain and gout. Note that approved indications differ by country.

Like any other COX-2 selective inhibitor ("coxib"), etoricoxib selectively inhibits isoform 2 of the enzyme cyclo-oxigenase (COX-2). This reduces the generation of prostaglandins (PGs) from arachidonic acid. Among the different functions exerted by PGs, their role in the inflammation cascade should be highlighted. COX-2 selective inhibitors showed less marked activity on type 1 cycloxigenase compared to traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). This reduced activity is the cause of reduced gastrointestinal side effects, as demonstrated in several large clinical trials performed with different coxibs.

Some clinical trials and meta-analysis showed that treatment with some coxibs (in particular rofecoxib) led to increased incidence of adverse cardiovascular events compared to placebo. Because of these results, some drugs were withdrawn from the market (rofecoxib, in September 2004 and valdecoxib in April 2005). In addition, the FDA and EMA (USA and European Community health authorities respectively) started a revision process of the entire class of both NSAID and COX-2 inhibitors.

The FDA concluded its revision on April 6, 2005: the final document can be found here.

The EMA concluded its revision on June 27, 2005: the final document can be found here.

On April 27, 2007, the Food and Drug Administration issued Merck a "non-approvable letter" for etoricoxib. The letter said Merck needs to provide more test results showing that the drug's benefits outweigh its risks before it has another chance of getting approved.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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