News tagged with interferon

Related topics: immune system , hepatitis c

Overactive immune response blocks itself

As part of the innate immune system natural killer cells (NK cells) play an important role in immune responses. For a long time they have been known as the first line of defense in the fight against infectious ...

Jul 26, 2013
popularity 4.7 / 5 (3) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

A first in front line immunity research

Monash University researchers have gained new insight into the early stages of our immune response, providing novel pathways to develop treatments for diseases from multiple sclerosis to cancer.

Jul 21, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (3) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Tumors disable immune cells by using up sugar

Cancer cells' appetite for sugar may have serious consequences for immune cell function, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned.

Jun 06, 2013
popularity 4.9 / 5 (7) | comments 1 | with audio podcast

Research deciphers HIV attack plan

(Medical Xpress)—A new study by Los Alamos National Laboratory and University of Pennsylvania scientists defines previously unknown properties of transmitted HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. The viruses ...

Apr 01, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

New MS drug proves effective where others have failed

A drug which 'reboots' a person's immune system has been shown to be an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who have already failed to respond to the first drug with which they were treated (a 'first-line' ...

Oct 31, 2012
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Interferon

Interferons (IFNs) are proteins made and released by host cells in response to the presence of pathogens—such as viruses, bacteria, or parasites—or tumor cells. They allow communication between cells to trigger the protective defenses of the immune system that eradicate pathogens or tumors.

IFNs belong to the large class of glycoproteins known as cytokines. Interferons are named after their ability to "interfere" with viral replication within host cells. IFNs have other functions: they activate immune cells, such as natural killer cells and macrophages; they increase recognition of infection or tumor cells by up-regulating antigen presentation to T lymphocytes; and they increase the ability of uninfected host cells to resist new infection by virus. Certain host symptoms, such as aching muscles and fever, are related to the production of IFNs during infection.

About ten distinct IFNs have been identified in mammals; seven of these have been described for humans. They are typically divided among three IFN classes: Type I IFN, Type II IFN, and Type III IFN. IFNs belonging to all IFN classes are very important for fighting viral infections.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA