News tagged with monkeys

Related topics: brain , primates

Mapping objects in the brain

A brain region that responds to a particular category of objects is found to consist of small clusters of neurons encoding visual features of these objects.

Dec 20, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Estrogen: Not just produced by the ovaries

A University of Wisconsin-Madison research team reports today that the brain can produce and release estrogen—a discovery that may lead to a better understanding of hormonal changes observed from before birth throughout ...

Dec 04, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (3) | comments 2 | with audio podcast

Monkey

Cebidae Aotidae Pitheciidae Atelidae Cercopithecidae

A monkey is any cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) or platyrrhine (New World monkey) primate. All primates that are not prosimians (lemurs and tarsiers) or apes are monkeys. The 264 known extant monkey species represent two of the three groupings of simian primates (the third group being the 21 species of apes). Monkeys are usually smaller and/or longer-tailed than apes.

The New World monkeys are classified within the parvorder Platyrrhini, whereas the Old World monkeys (superfamily Cercopithecoidea) form part of the parvorder Catarrhini, which also includes the apes. Thus, scientifically speaking, monkeys are paraphyletic (not a single coherent group), and Old World monkeys are actually more closely related to the apes than they are to the New World monkeys.

Due to its size (up to 1 m/3 ft) the Mandrill is often thought to be an ape, but it is actually an Old World monkey. Also, a few monkey species have the word "ape" in their common name.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA