News tagged with paracetamol

Could painkillers be causing your headaches?

(Medical Xpress)—People who regularly take medicines, such as aspirin, paracetamol and triptans could be causing themselves more pain than relief. New guidance out today (Wednesday 19 September) from the ...

Sep 19, 2012
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Paracetamol improves exercise endurance in the heat

Paracetamol has a significant effect on exercise performance and the body's ability to cope with the thermal challenge of exercise in the heat, shows a study published today [20 September] in Experimental Physiology.

Sep 19, 2013
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Ibuprofen-codeine misuse a health risk

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers have recommended that drugs combining codeine and other pain killers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen, be restricted to prescription-only following reports of misuse and fatalities.

Sep 18, 2013
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Paracetamol no better than placebo for lower back pain

Paracetamol is no better than placebo at speeding recovery from acute episodes of lower back pain or improving pain levels, function, sleep, or quality of life, according to the first large randomised trial to compare the ...

Jul 24, 2014
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Paracetamol

Paracetamol INN ( /ˌpærəˈsiːtəmɒl/ or /ˌpærəˈsɛtəmɒl/), or acetaminophen USAN i/əˌsiːtəˈmɪnəfɨn/, is a widely used over-the-counter analgesic (pain reliever) and antipyretic (fever reducer). It is commonly used for the relief of headaches and other minor aches and pains and is a major ingredient in numerous cold and flu remedies. In combination with opioid analgesics, paracetamol can also be used in the management of more severe pain such as post surgical pain and providing palliative care in advanced cancer patients. The onset of analgesia is approximately 11 minutes after oral administration of paracetamol, and its half-life is 1–4 hours.

While generally safe for use at recommended doses (1,000 mg per single dose and up to 3,000 mg per day for adults, up to 2,000 mg per day if drinking alcohol), acute overdoses of paracetamol can cause potentially fatal liver damage and, in rare individuals, a normal dose can do the same; the risk is heightened by alcohol consumption. Paracetamol toxicity is the foremost cause of acute liver failure in the Western world, and accounts for most drug overdoses in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

It is the active metabolite of phenacetin, once popular as an analgesic and antipyretic in its own right, but unlike phenacetin and its combinations, paracetamol is not considered to be carcinogenic at therapeutic doses. The words acetaminophen (used in the United States, Canada, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, and Iran) and paracetamol (used elsewhere) both come from chemical names for the compound: para-acetylaminophenol and para-acetylaminophenol. In some contexts, it is simply abbreviated as APAP, for acetyl-para-aminophenol.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA