News tagged with plastic

Related topics: brain , neurons , synapses

Seoul to limit plastic surgery ads

The South Korean capital Seoul is to restrict the use of plastic surgery adverts on public transport, officials said Wednesday, after complaints that they were fuelling an unhealthy obsession with body image.

Mar 26, 2014
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Common sense, moderation are key on food safety issues

There is often debate over whether or not certain household and food-related products are safe for consumer use or consumption. The controversy often causes media hype that can scare consumers into avoiding common and useful ...

Feb 28, 2014
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Taiwan bans cosmetic surgery for under-18s

Taiwan on Thursday banned "medically unnecessary" plastic surgery on under-18s in an attempt to protect beauty-obsessed youngsters who overlook the health risks of such procedures, officials said.

Feb 27, 2014
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Necks, butts growth areas for U.S. plastic surgeons

(HealthDay)—Eyelid surgery and facelifts are up. So are butt augmentations and neck lifts, according to new figures from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons that show a steady increase in cosmetic ...

Feb 26, 2014
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Can you boost your brain power through video?

Watching video of simple tasks before carrying them out may boost the brain's structure, or plasticity, and increase motor skills, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's ...

Feb 18, 2014
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Feeling sleepy? Maybe your brain's too full

Sleep is an essential state of the brain but why do animals risk the vulnerability that comes with not being conscious for hours? What happens in the brain during sleep that's so vital for life?

Feb 06, 2014
popularity 4 / 5 (5) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Amplifying communication between neurons

Neurons send signals to each other across small junctions called synapses. Some of these signals involve the flow of potassium, calcium and sodium ions through channel proteins that are embedded within the ...

Jan 17, 2014
popularity 4.8 / 5 (4) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Biochemical mechanisms of memory

A discovery by a research team led by Ryohei Yasuda at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience has significantly advanced basic understanding of biochemical mechanisms associated with how memories are formed.

Dec 09, 2013
popularity 4.7 / 5 (6) | comments 1 | with audio podcast

Plastic

Plastic is the general common term for a wide range of synthetic or semisynthetic organic amorphous solid materials suitable for the manufacture of industrial products. Plastics are typically polymers of high molecular weight, and may contain other substances to improve performance and/or reduce costs.

The word derives from the Greek πλαστικός (plastikos) meaning fit for molding, and πλαστός (plastos) meaning molded. It refers to their malleability, or plasticity during manufacture, that allows them to be cast, pressed, or extruded into an enormous variety of shapes—such as films, fibers, plates, tubes, bottles, boxes, and much more.

The common word plastic should not be confused with the technical adjective plastic, which is applied to any material which undergoes a permanent change of shape (plastic deformation) when strained beyond a certain point. Aluminum, for instance, is plastic in this sense, but not a plastic in the common sense; while some plastics, in their finished forms, will break before deforming and therefore are not plastic in the technical sense.

There are two types of plastics: thermoplastics and thermosets. Thermoplastics, if exposed to enough heat, will melt. Thermosets will keep their shape until they are charred and burnt. Some examples of thermoplastics are grocery bags, piano keys and some automobile parts. Examples of thermosets are children's dinner sets and circuit boards.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA