News tagged with single nucleotide polymorphisms

Related topics: genetic variation

The genetic roots of adolescent scoliosis

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis—a condition featuring curvature of the spine—affects tens of millions of children worldwide, but does not have a known cause. Now, scientists at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical ...

Jul 23, 2015
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Researchers discover genetic links to rosacea

Today marked the publication of the first ever genome-wide association study of rosacea, a common and incurable skin disorder. Led by Dr. Anne Lynn S. Chang of Stanford University's School of Medicine, and co-authored by ...

Mar 10, 2015
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Single-nucleotide polymorphism

A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced snip) is a DNA sequence variation occurring when a single nucleotide — A, T, C, or G — in the genome (or other shared sequence) differs between members of a species (or between paired chromosomes in an individual). For example, two sequenced DNA fragments from different individuals, AAGCCTA to AAGCTTA, contain a difference in a single nucleotide. In this case we say that there are two alleles : C and T. Almost all common SNPs have only two alleles.

Within a population, SNPs can be assigned a minor allele frequency — the lowest allele frequency at a locus that is observed in a particular population. This is simply the lesser of the two allele frequencies for single-nucleotide polymorphisms[1]. There are variations between human populations, so a SNP allele that is common in one geographical or ethnic group may be much rarer in another.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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