News tagged with single nucleotide polymorphisms

Related topics: genetic variation

Hormonal status impacts genetic variation, CIMT link

(HealthDay)—Hormonal status seems to interact with genetic variants to influence cardiovascular phenotypes, especially those within the innate immunity pathway related to carotid artery intima-medial thickness (CIMT), according ...

Nov 13, 2015
popularity11 comments 0

Neurodermatitis genes influence other allergies

There's a typical "career" for some allergic people, and it starts very early on the skin: babies develop atopic dermatitis, food allergies may follow, then comes asthma and later on hay fever. A group of scientists led by ...

Nov 06, 2015
popularity13 comments 0

Single-nucleotide polymorphism

A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced snip) is a DNA sequence variation occurring when a single nucleotide — A, T, C, or G — in the genome (or other shared sequence) differs between members of a species (or between paired chromosomes in an individual). For example, two sequenced DNA fragments from different individuals, AAGCCTA to AAGCTTA, contain a difference in a single nucleotide. In this case we say that there are two alleles : C and T. Almost all common SNPs have only two alleles.

Within a population, SNPs can be assigned a minor allele frequency — the lowest allele frequency at a locus that is observed in a particular population. This is simply the lesser of the two allele frequencies for single-nucleotide polymorphisms[1]. There are variations between human populations, so a SNP allele that is common in one geographical or ethnic group may be much rarer in another.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed