News tagged with sun exposure

Related topics: skin cancer , vitamin d

Blue-eyed people may face higher melanoma risk

(HealthDay)—New research suggests that genes tied to blue eyes and red hair could put people at higher risk for moles or freckling in childhood, which are often precursors to the deadly skin cancer melanoma ...

Nov 19, 2014
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How much time in the sun for healthy Vitamin D?

(Medical Xpress)—A world first QUT study aims to pinpoint the amount of time Queenslanders need to spend in the sun to achieve healthy levels of Vitamin D, by investigating the effect sunlight has on Vitamin ...

Sep 09, 2014
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Will the solarium ban prevent skin cancer?

With the ban on commercial solariums coming into force this year, Flinders University's Dr Ivanka Prichard is questioning whether the new law will actually reduce skin cancer rates or simply lead to more ...

Mar 11, 2014
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Study highlights need for better sunscreens

A low level of daily exposure to a common component of sunlight can cause skin damage at the molecular level after just a few days, new University of Michigan Medical School research shows.

Dec 04, 2013
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Sunburn

A sunburn is a burn to living tissue such as skin produced by overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, commonly from the sun's rays. Usual mild symptoms in humans and animals are red or reddish skin that is hot to the touch, general fatigue, and mild dizziness. An excess of UV-radiation can be life-threatening in extreme cases. Exposure of the skin to lesser amounts of UV radiation will often produce a suntan.

Excessive UV-radiation is the leading cause of primarily non malignant skin tumors. Sunscreen is widely agreed to prevent sunburn, although a minority of scientists argue that it may not effectively protect against malignant melanoma, which is either caused by a different part of the ultraviolet spectrum or, according to others, not caused by sun exposure at all. Clothing, including hats, is considered the preferred skin protection method. Moderate sun tanning without burning can also prevent subsequent sunburn, as it increases the amount of melanin, a skin photoprotectant pigment that is the skin's natural defense against overexposure. Importantly, sunburn and the increase in melanin production are both triggered by direct DNA damage. When the skin cells' DNA is damaged by UV radiation, type I cell-death is triggered and the skin is replaced. Malignant melanoma may occur as a result of indirect DNA damage if the damage is not properly repaired. Proper repair occurs in the majority of DNA damage, and as a result not every exposure to UV results in cancer. The only cure for sunburn is slow healing, although some skin creams can help with the symptoms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA