News tagged with teeth

Related topics: dinosaurs , fossil

Want whiter teeth? Fruit mixture is not the answer

Can you ditch the strips and dump the dentist for whiter teeth? From "The Dr. Oz Show" to YouTube videos, experts say you can reclaim those pearly whites simply by mixing fruit, such as strawberries, with ...

Oct 14, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (5) | comments 0

Survey of toddlers' teeth shows ticking time bomb

The first ever survey of oral health in three-year-olds in England has been conducted by Public Health England, which released its report this week. It made shocking reading – some 12 per cent of toddlers ...

Oct 06, 2014
popularity 4 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Japan tooth patch could be end of decay

Scientists in Japan have created a microscopically thin film that can coat individual teeth to prevent decay or to make them appear whiter, the chief researcher said.

Sep 16, 2012
popularity 4.6 / 5 (46) | comments 15

Top 5 back-to-school tips for your oral health

It's that time of year again: back-to-school and back to the books. While you're busy buying your texts at the Dal Bookstore and getting organized for (and, sometimes, stressed out about) your classes, your ...

Sep 12, 2014
popularity 3 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Biological tooth replacement—a step closer

Scientists have developed a new method of replacing missing teeth with a bioengineered material generated from a person's own gum cells. Current implant-based methods of whole tooth replacement fail to reproduce a natural ...

Mar 09, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (2) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Tooth

Teeth (singular tooth) are small whitish structures found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates that are used to tear, scrape, and chew food. Some animals, particularly carnivores, also use teeth for hunting or defense. The roots of teeth are covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of tissues of varying density and hardness.

Teeth are among the most distinctive (and long-lasting) features of mammal species. Paleontologists use teeth to identify fossil species and determine their relationships. The shape of the animal's teeth are related to its diet. For example, plant matter is hard to digest, so herbivores have many molars for chewing. Carnivores, on the other hand, need canines to kill prey and to tear meat.

Mammals are diphyodont, meaning that they develop two sets of teeth. In humans, the first set (the "baby," "milk," "primary" or "deciduous" set) normally starts to appear at about six months of age, although some babies are born with one or more visible teeth, known as neonatal teeth. Normal tooth eruption at about six months is known as teething and can be painful.

Some animals develop only one set of teeth (monophyodont) while others develop many sets (polyphyodont). Sharks, for example, grow a new set of teeth every two weeks to replace worn teeth. Rodent incisors grow and wear away continually through gnawing, maintaining relatively constant length. Many rodents such as voles (but not mice) and guinea pigs, as well as rabbits, have continuously growing molars in addition to incisors.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA