Cardiology

Team improves emergency care for patients with chest pain

Emergency physicians at Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Southern California reduced hospital admissions and cardiac stress testing by using new criteria to assess the level of risk patients with chest pain have for subsequent ...

Cardiology

Getting back to work after a heart attack

Heart attack patients with the desire to return to work can do it. That's the main message of a paper published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

Health

Late dinner and no breakfast is a killer combination

People who skip breakfast and eat dinner near bedtime have worse outcomes after a heart attack. That's the finding of research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society ...

Cardiology

Mild congenital heart defects tied to CVD events

(HealthDay)—Individuals with lower-complexity adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) have a higher burden of adverse cardiovascular events than the general population, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors, ...

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Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is usually one of three diseases involving the coronary arteries: ST elevation myocardial infarction (30%), non ST elevation myocardial infarction (25%), or unstable angina (38%).

These types are named according to the appearance of the electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There can be some variation as to which forms of MI are classified under acute coronary syndrome.

ACS should be distinguished from stable angina, which develops during exertion and resolves at rest. In contrast with stable angina, unstable angina occurs suddenly, often at rest or with minimal exertion, or at lesser degrees of exertion than the individual's previous angina ("crescendo angina"). New onset angina is also considered unstable angina, since it suggests a new problem in a coronary artery.

Though ACS is usually associated with coronary thrombosis, it can also be associated with cocaine use. Cardiac chest pain can also be precipitated by anemia, bradycardias (excessively slow heart rate) or tachycardias (excessively fast heart rate).

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