Cardiology

SCAI stages of cardiogenic shock stratify mortality risk

A new shock classification scheme released by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association, the Society of Critical ...

Cardiology

Microbes may play a role in heart attack onset

Microorganisms in the body may contribute to destabilisation of coronary plaques and subsequent heart attack, according to late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology.

Cardiology

Women with heart attack do present with typical symptoms

(HealthDay)—Typical symptoms of myocardial infarction are more common and have greater predictive value in women than in men, according to a study published in the Sept. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Cardiology

Pollution and winter linked with rise in heart attack treatment

Heavily polluted areas have a higher rate of angioplasty procedures to treat blocked arteries than areas with clean air, according to research to be presented at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. ...

Medications

Ezetimibe reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes

Patients with a history of coronary heart disease (CHD) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) benefit more from treatment with a statin in combination with ezetimibe than from treatment with a statin alone. However, there is no ...

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Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is usually one of three diseases involving the coronary arteries: ST elevation myocardial infarction (30%), non ST elevation myocardial infarction (25%), or unstable angina (38%).

These types are named according to the appearance of the electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There can be some variation as to which forms of MI are classified under acute coronary syndrome.

ACS should be distinguished from stable angina, which develops during exertion and resolves at rest. In contrast with stable angina, unstable angina occurs suddenly, often at rest or with minimal exertion, or at lesser degrees of exertion than the individual's previous angina ("crescendo angina"). New onset angina is also considered unstable angina, since it suggests a new problem in a coronary artery.

Though ACS is usually associated with coronary thrombosis, it can also be associated with cocaine use. Cardiac chest pain can also be precipitated by anemia, bradycardias (excessively slow heart rate) or tachycardias (excessively fast heart rate).

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