Cardiology

Secondary analysis confirms safety of blood thinning agent

Treatment with the blood thinner apixaban was associated with a lower risk of bleeding, death and hospitalization compared with warfarin, regardless of history of prior stroke or blood clot, according to a secondary analysis ...

Cardiology

Risk of major heart complications up shortly following stroke

(HealthDay)—Ischemic stroke is independently associated with increased risk of incident poststroke major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in both men and women, according to a study published in the February issue of ...

Medical research

New cardiogenic shock staging system identifies mortality risk

The new Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Intervention (SCAI) cardiogenic shock (CS) classification scheme provides risk stratification for hospital mortality, according to a study recently published in the Journal ...

Cardiology

Technique reveals whether models of patient risk are accurate

After a patient has a heart attack or stroke, doctors often use risk models to help guide their treatment. These models can calculate a patient's risk of dying based on factors such as the patient's age, symptoms, and other ...

Cardiology

Uric acid levels predict death in acute coronary syndrome

(HealthDay) -- Elevated uric acid levels are predictive of one-year mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is usually one of three diseases involving the coronary arteries: ST elevation myocardial infarction (30%), non ST elevation myocardial infarction (25%), or unstable angina (38%).

These types are named according to the appearance of the electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There can be some variation as to which forms of MI are classified under acute coronary syndrome.

ACS should be distinguished from stable angina, which develops during exertion and resolves at rest. In contrast with stable angina, unstable angina occurs suddenly, often at rest or with minimal exertion, or at lesser degrees of exertion than the individual's previous angina ("crescendo angina"). New onset angina is also considered unstable angina, since it suggests a new problem in a coronary artery.

Though ACS is usually associated with coronary thrombosis, it can also be associated with cocaine use. Cardiac chest pain can also be precipitated by anemia, bradycardias (excessively slow heart rate) or tachycardias (excessively fast heart rate).

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