Medical research

New study shows how tumor cells use mitochondria to keep growing

Hormone therapy is often used to treat prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, but many patients develop resistance to hormone therapy, causing their disease to become more aggressive and potentially more ...

Oncology & Cancer

Blood cancer cures and care: Addressing leukemia and lymphoma

Every four minutes, someone in the United States is diagnosed with a type of blood cancer, such as lymphoma or leukemia. According to the American Cancer Society's estimates, approximately 60,530 cases of leukemia and 90,000 ...

Oncology & Cancer

Childhood cancer: 3 most common types

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, which makes this a good time to learn about three of the most common types of cancers in children: acute lymphocytic leukemia, neuroblastoma and pediatric brain tumors.

Oncology & Cancer

What do you know about leukemia and lymphoma?

September is Leukemia and Lymphoma Awareness Month, which makes this a good time to learn about some of the most common types of these two diseases.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Privileged white U.S. citizens have better health outcomes

(HealthDay)—Privileged White U.S. citizens have better health outcomes than average U.S. citizens for several health outcomes, but health outcomes are not always better than those in other developed countries, according ...

Oncology & Cancer

New treatment approach for leukemia

The BCR/ABL gene, which does not occur among healthy people, has been shown to be a causative agent in the pathogenesis of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The gene causes white blood cells to become leukemia cells that ...

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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a form of leukemia, or cancer of the white blood cells characterized by excess lymphoblasts.

Malignant, immature white blood cells continuously multiply and are overproduced in the bone marrow. ALL causes damage and death by crowding out normal cells in the bone marrow, and by spreading (infiltrating) to other organs. ALL is most common in childhood with a peak incidence at 2–5 years of age, and another peak in old age. The overall cure rate in children is about 80%, and about 45%-60% of adults have long-term disease-free survival.

Acute refers to the relatively short time course of the disease (being fatal in as little as a few weeks if left untreated) to differentiate it from the very different disease of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which has a potential time course of many years. It is interchangeably referred to as Lymphocytic or Lymphoblastic. This refers to the cells that are involved, which if they were normal would be referred to as lymphocytes but are seen in this disease in a relatively immature (also termed 'blast') state.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA