Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Two former Japan cruise ship passengers die

Two elderly former passengers from the coronavirus-wracked Diamond Princess died Thursday, Japanese authorities said, as fears mount for those who have left the ship after testing negative for the virus.

Health

Clinical trials: how to make informed consent more ethical

It has been illegal to treat humans like guinea pigs since the Nuremberg trials, in which Nazi doctors were punished for doing unspeakable things to prisoners. These days, we have to explain the experiment to the people taking ...

Medications

What happens to medicines after their use-by dates

It is estimated that there is a staggering £300m worth of medicine unused in the UK every year. But is it safe to take these medicines if they are past their expiry date?

Neuroscience

Blood pressure drug could help problem drinkers

A drug used to treat high blood pressure may alleviate anxiety induced by long-term heavy alcohol use, and also halt the damage such drinking can cause to the brain's ability to grow new cells, QUT research shows.

Cardiology

Ivabradine improves angina-related quality of life

(HealthDay)—For patients with angina pectoris, ivabradine is associated with improvements in certain parameters of quality of life (QoL), according to a study published online Dec. 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality ...

Cardiology

Device used in europe promising for refractory angina

(HealthDay)—A stent-like device placed in the coronary sinus may benefit patients with refractory angina, according to a small clinical trial published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The Reducer ...

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Angina pectoris, commonly known as angina, is chest pain due to ischemia (a lack of blood, thus a lack of oxygen supply and waste removal) of the heart muscle, generally due to obstruction or spasm of the coronary arteries (the heart's blood vessels). Coronary artery disease, the main cause of angina, is due to atherosclerosis of the cardiac arteries. The term derives from the Latin angina ("infection of the throat") from the Greek ἀγχόνη ankhonē ("strangling"), and the Latin pectus ("chest"), and can therefore be translated as "a strangling feeling in the chest".

There is a weak relationship between severity of pain and degree of oxygen deprivation in the heart muscle (i.e., there can be severe pain with little or no risk of a heart attack, and a heart attack can occur without pain).

Worsening ("crescendo") angina attacks, sudden-onset angina at rest, and angina lasting more than 15 minutes are symptoms of unstable angina (usually grouped with similar conditions as the acute coronary syndrome). As these may herald myocardial infarction (a heart attack), they require urgent medical attention and are generally treated as a presumed heart attack.

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