Cardiology

Postconditioning during PCI for STEMI shows delayed benefits

(HealthDay)—The benefits of postconditioning (PostC) balloon inflations in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may not be apparent immediately, ...

Cardiology

Could a heart attack or stroke lead to early menopause?

New research has found that women who have a heart attack, stroke or some other type of cardiovascular event before age 35 have twice the risk of going into early menopause—which could create its own set of health hazards.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Benzodiazepines may decrease mortality in congestive heart failure

A study published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics indicates that treatment of anxiety with benzodiazepines may improve survival in congestive heart failure. Depression (in various forms and as various ...

Medical research

Harmful placebos

How could a sugar pill placebo cause harm? A new review of data from 250,726 trial participants has found that 1 in 20 people who took placebos in trials dropped out because of serious adverse events (side effects). Almost ...

Cardiology

Statins have low risk of side effects

The cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins have demonstrated substantial benefits in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes caused by blood clots (ischemic strokes) in at-risk patients. Since statins are associated ...

Cardiology

Ivabradine improves angina-related quality of life

(HealthDay)—For patients with angina pectoris, ivabradine is associated with improvements in certain parameters of quality of life (QoL), according to a study published online Dec. 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality ...

Cardiology

Device used in europe promising for refractory angina

(HealthDay)—A stent-like device placed in the coronary sinus may benefit patients with refractory angina, according to a small clinical trial published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The Reducer ...

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Angina pectoris, commonly known as angina, is chest pain due to ischemia (a lack of blood, thus a lack of oxygen supply and waste removal) of the heart muscle, generally due to obstruction or spasm of the coronary arteries (the heart's blood vessels). Coronary artery disease, the main cause of angina, is due to atherosclerosis of the cardiac arteries. The term derives from the Latin angina ("infection of the throat") from the Greek ἀγχόνη ankhonē ("strangling"), and the Latin pectus ("chest"), and can therefore be translated as "a strangling feeling in the chest".

There is a weak relationship between severity of pain and degree of oxygen deprivation in the heart muscle (i.e., there can be severe pain with little or no risk of a heart attack, and a heart attack can occur without pain).

Worsening ("crescendo") angina attacks, sudden-onset angina at rest, and angina lasting more than 15 minutes are symptoms of unstable angina (usually grouped with similar conditions as the acute coronary syndrome). As these may herald myocardial infarction (a heart attack), they require urgent medical attention and are generally treated as a presumed heart attack.

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