Digestive Diseases

Possible treatment for deadly weight loss

Many cancer patients are susceptible to potentially lethal weight loss. Now researchers understand better why this happens, and perhaps how to prevent the condition. "Our goal is to know more about what happens in cancer ...

12 hours ago
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Is cancer just a question of 'bad luck'?

"Doctor, what caused my cancer?" For doctors, this question is often perplexing. Some of the population risk factors are known, but when it comes to specific cases, only assumptions can be made. However, scientists have a ...

Jul 19, 2017
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How CD44s gives brain cancer a survival advantage

Understanding the mechanisms that give cancer cells the ability to survive and grow opens the possibility of developing improved treatments to control or cure the disease. In the case of glioblastoma multiforme, the deadliest ...

Jul 19, 2017
popularity71 comments 0

Higher IQ in childhood is linked to a longer life

Higher intelligence (IQ) in childhood is associated with a lower lifetime risk of major causes of death, including heart disease, stroke, smoking related cancers, respiratory disease and dementia, finds a study published ...

Jun 28, 2017
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All diseases that pertain to the gastrointestinal tract are labelled as digestive diseases. This includes diseases of the esophagus, stomach, first, second, and third part of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, the ileo-cecal complex, large intestine (ascending, transverse, and descending colon), sigmoid colon, and rectum.

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