Smoking Cessation

Smoking affects the heart, lungs ... and bones

As the new year begins, many people will resolve to quit smoking. Although most smokers realize the habit isn't good for their hearts and lungs, Washington University orthopaedic surgeons remind them that lung and heart health ...

Jan 03, 2014
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Smoking and neurosurgical outcomes

The effects of long-term cigarette smoking on morbidity and mortality have long been known. In a more immediate sense, smoking in the days and weeks before surgery can lead to morbidity and complications for many surgical ...

Jun 18, 2013
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Naltrexone can help heavy social drinkers quit smoking

Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist approved in 1994 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for alcohol-dependence (AD) treatment, can reduce relapse rates among AD patients. Research on naltrexone's effectiveness on nicotine ...

Mar 19, 2009
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Program helps patients quit smoking before surgery

(HealthDay)—A smoking cessation intervention offered in a preadmission clinic is associated with decreased rates of smoking on the day of surgery and 30 days postoperatively, according to research published in the September ...

Sep 09, 2013
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Patients who smoke want respect from physicians

What is it like to be someone who smokes in today's increasingly smoke-free world? How can providers best interact with their patients who smoke and support their efforts to become tobacco-free? A new study by researchers ...

Mar 04, 2015
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Smoking cessation (colloquially quitting smoking) is the process of discontinuing the practice of inhaling a smoked substance. This article focuses exclusively on cessation of tobacco smoking; however, the methods described may apply to cessation of smoking other substances that can be difficult to stop using due to the development of strong physical substance dependence or psychological dependence (in more common parlance, addiction).

Smoking cessation can be achieved with or without assistance from healthcare professionals or the use of medications. Methods that have been found to be effective include interventions directed at or via health care providers and health care systems; medications including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and varenicline; individual and group counselling; and Web-based or stand-alone and computer programs. Although stopping smoking can cause short-term side effects such as reversible weight gain, smoking cessation services and activities are cost-effective because of the positive health benefits.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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