Aging Cell

Aging Cell is the leading journal in geriatrics and gerontology and aims to publish novel and exciting science which addresses fundamental issues in the molecular biology of aging. All areas of aging biology are welcome in the journal and the experimental approaches used can be wide-ranging. With rapid developments in genomics, proteomics and other high throughput technologies, the combined analytical powers of genetics, biochemistry and cell biology are leading to increasingly rapid discoveries on the basic mechanisms of biological aging. Aging Cell welcomes the results of this exciting research.

Publisher
Wiley
Impact factor
6.265 (2011)

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Neuroscience

Calcium is key to age-related memory loss

Research at the University of Leicester is offering new clues into how and why cognitive functions such as memory and learning become impaired with age. A paper published recently in a specialist neuroscience journal shows ...

Neuroscience

MARCKS protein may help protect brain cells from age damage

A common protein, when produced by specialized barrier cells in the brain, could help protect the brain from damage due to aging. This protein – MARCKS – may act as both a bouncer and a housekeeping service, by helping ...

Medical research

Scientists find class of drugs that boosts healthy lifespan

A research team from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Mayo Clinic and other institutions has identified a new class of drugs that in animal models dramatically slows the aging process—alleviating symptoms of frailty, ...

Medical research

New study identifies molecular aging 'midlife crisis'

Just as a computer requires code to work, our bodies are regulated by molecular "programs" that are written early in life and then have to do their job properly for a lifetime. But do they? It's a question that has intrigued ...

Medical research

Biologists find a way to boost intestinal stem cell populations

Cells that line the intestinal tract are replaced every few days, a high rate of turnover that relies on a healthy population of intestinal stem cells. MIT and University of Tokyo biologists have now found that aging takes ...

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