Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research (ACER) was founded by the National Council on Alcoholism (now the NCADD). Alcoholism and alcohol abuse cause significant social and medical harm, and research into the etiology and consequences of alcohol use is essential to guide prevention, treatment and policy. ACER gives readers direct access to the most significant and current research findings on the nature and management of alcoholism and alcohol-related disorders. Each month this journal brings basic science researchers and health care professionals the latest clinical studies and research findings on alcoholism, alcohol-induced syndromes and organ damage. The journal includes categories of basic science, clinical research, and treatment methods

Website
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0145-6008

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Gender gap seen in accessing alcohol treatment with cirrhosis

(HealthDay)—Women with alcohol-associated cirrhosis (AC) are less likely to receive alcohol use disorder (AUD) treatment than men with the disease even though such treatment is associated with improved outcomes at one year, ...

Health

Even light drinking increases risk of death

Drinking a daily glass of wine for health reasons may not be so healthy after all, suggests a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Health

Number of drinks predicts teens' other risky behaviors

(HealthDay)—The number of drinks consumed in high school students' binge drinking episodes predicts other health risk behaviors, according to a study published online April 10 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Health

Text message-based intervention helps with sobriety maintenance

(HealthDay)—Mobile alcohol interventions may help liver transplant candidates with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) maintain sobriety, according to a study published online March 2 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Health

High-risk typologies for heavy drinking ID'd in underage women

(HealthDay)—For underage women, high-risk trajectories have been identified for heavy episodic drinking (HED), and feminine norms are associated with latent trajectory classes, according to a study published online Feb. ...

Health

Researchers study inebriation at sporting events

In many western countries, public concern about violence and other problems at sporting events has increased. Alcohol is often involved. Research shows that approximately 40 percent of the spectators drink alcohol while ...

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