American Journal of Preventive Medicine

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine is the official journal of the American College of Preventive Medicine and the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. It publishes articles in the areas of prevention research, teaching, practice and policy. Original research is published on interventions aimed at the prevention of chronic and acute disease and the promotion of individual and community health. Of particular emphasis are papers that address the primary and secondary prevention of important clinical, behavioral and public health issues such as injury and violence, infectious disease, women's health, smoking, sedentary behaviors and physical activity, nutrition, diabetes, obesity, and alcohol and drug abuse. Papers also address educational initiatives aimed at improving the ability of health professionals to provide effective clinical prevention and public health services. Papers on health services research pertinent to prevention and public health are also published. The journal also publishes official policy statements from the two co-sponsoring organizations, review articles, media reviews, and editorials.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.ajpmonline.org/
Impact factor
4.110 (2010)

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why are blacks, other minorities hardest hit by COVID-19?

(HealthDay)—The new coronavirus is disproportionately striking minority populations—particularly urban blacks and Navajo Indians living on their reservation. Experts say social and economic factors that predate the COVID-19 ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Veterans battle homelessness long after discharge from the military

According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, homelessness among US military veterans rarely occurs immediately after military discharge, but instead takes years to manifest with risk increasing ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Race and income shape COVID-19 risk

Underlying conditions that increase risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19 are much more common among Black, Native American, and lower-income people in the United States.

Diabetes

Evaluating grip strength to identify early diabetes

A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine reports valuable new grip strength metrics that provide healthcare practitioners with an easy-to-perform, time-efficient screening tool for type 2 diabetes (T2DM).

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