Annals of Family Medicine

Annals of Family Medicine is a bimonthly peer-reviewed medical journal that was established in May/June 2003. It publishes original research from the clinical, biomedical, social and health services sciences, as well as contributions on methodology and theory, selected reviews, essays, and invited editorials. The journal is abstracted and indexed in MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, Cinahl, Science Citation Index Expanded, and Current Contents/Clinical Medicine.

Website
http://www.annfammed.org/

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Diabetes

Tool aids safe fasting for T2DM patients observing Ramadan

(HealthDay)—Use of the Fasting Algorithm for Singaporeans with Type 2 Diabetes (FAST) facilitates safe intermittent fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan, according to a study published in the March/April issue ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Health coaches improve inhaler use in COPD patients

(HealthDay)—Lay health coaches may improve inhaler technique and adherence for low-income patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals ...

Medications

Safety, effectiveness of VKAs, DOACs similar in general practice

(HealthDay)—For patients receiving anticoagulants, arteriovenous events and major bleeding events do not differ for those receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), according to a study ...

Health

Artificial intelligence and family medicine: Better together

Attention all family medicine physicians: Identify a computer scientist with expertise in artificial intelligence (AI). Pick up the phone. Make a connection. This is your chance to shape the future of the AI revolution. Dr. ...

Health

Certified medical homes tied to better diabetes outcomes

(HealthDay)—Primary care practices certified as medical homes have more practice systems and higher performance on diabetes care versus uncertified practices, according to a study published in the January/February issue ...

Cardiology

When the best treatment for hypertension is to wait

A new study from the University of Missouri concluded that a physician's decision not to intensify hypertension treatment is often a contextually appropriate choice. In two-thirds of cases where physicians did not change ...

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