Annals of Internal Medicine

Annals of Internal Medicine is an academic medical journal published by the American College of Physicians (ACP). It publishes research articles and reviews in the area of internal medicine. Its current editor is Christine Laine. The journal had a 2011 impact factor of 16.7, which makes it among the most-cited of general clinical medical journals, only exceeded by Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine. Founded in 1927, Annals of Internal Medicine has been published twice monthly since 1988. Former Editor-in-Chief, Edward Huth, has published details of the journal s history. Medical publishing innovations by the journal include: An archive of issues from 1993 is available at the journal s website in text and PDF (from 1999) formats. Some material over six months old is freely accessible, and access to all papers is provided free of charge to developing countries.

Publisher
American College of Physicians
Country
United States
History
1927–present
Impact factor
16.7 (2011)

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

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Cardiology

Heart failure medication often prescribed in insufficient doses

Important medications for the treatment of heart failure are often prescribed in lower dosages than recommended by international guidelines. A study with the participation of the Medical University of Vienna shows overly ...

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