Annals of Internal Medicine

Annals of Internal Medicine is an academic medical journal published by the American College of Physicians (ACP). It publishes research articles and reviews in the area of internal medicine. Its current editor is Christine Laine. The journal had a 2011 impact factor of 16.7, which makes it among the most-cited of general clinical medical journals, only exceeded by Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine. Founded in 1927, Annals of Internal Medicine has been published twice monthly since 1988. Former Editor-in-Chief, Edward Huth, has published details of the journal s history. Medical publishing innovations by the journal include: An archive of issues from 1993 is available at the journal s website in text and PDF (from 1999) formats. Some material over six months old is freely accessible, and access to all papers is provided free of charge to developing countries.

Publisher
American College of Physicians
Country
United States
History
1927–present
Impact factor
16.7 (2011)

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Doctor burnout costs health care system $4.6 billion a year

Burnout among doctors is costing the U.S. health-care system an estimated $4.6 billion a year in billings because of reduced hours, physician turnover, and expenses associated with finding and hiring replacements, according ...

Medications

About 12 percent with ankle sprain fill opioid prescriptions

(HealthDay)—Overall, 11.9 percent of patients diagnosed with an ankle sprain fill an opioid prescription within seven days of diagnosis, according to a research letter published online July 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

In-hospital maternal mortality down in pregnancies with lupus

(HealthDay)—In-hospital maternal mortality decreased from 1998 to 2015 in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and non-SLE pregnancies, with a greater decline for SLE pregnancies, according to a study published online July ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Pregnancy outcomes greatly improved in lupus patients

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Neuroscience

Self-management strategies offer limited benefit in epilepsy

(HealthDay)—Limited evidence suggests that self-management strategies modestly improve some outcomes among persons with epilepsy, according to a review published online July 2 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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